EVENT: 2017 Greater Mekong WLE Forum: 'Bringing the Village to the Conference: Local Salween Research'

 Ethnic woman in yunnan, China (Credit: Green Watershed)

Ethnic woman in yunnan, China (Credit: Green Watershed)

By Robert Irven

The 2017 Greater Mekong Forum on Water, Food and Energy has officially kicked of and researchers, scientists, policy makers, non-state actors, civil service, journalist and every other profession that you could imagine with an interest in water in Southeast Asia have all come together in Yangon, Myanmar for a three day event that will touch on a diverse and highly-inclusive array of topics related to the region and beyond. 

Our Salween water governance research, comprising of researchers and staff members from York University Center for Asian Research, the Center for Social Development Studies, Chulalongkorn University, Weaving Bonds Across Borders and Green Watershed, presented in a way that was meant to bring their fieldwork and uncovered stories from remote communities to the conference for all interested participants to see first hand what is happening on the ground there as it relates to the challenges, threats and opportunities of water governance. 

 Presenters from the Mon Pan Local Research team (Credit: R. Irven)

Presenters from the Mon Pan Local Research team (Credit: R. Irven)

The first video and subsequent Q&A session, presented by the Mong Par Youth Association and Weaving Bonds Across Borders, focused on the Mong Pan region. The session revealed the intimate relationship between the community and water, as well as how the divisions of labor and responsibility in terms of gender relate to water. The session also highlighted the  implications of growing human settlements and extractive industries (logging; small scale mining) growing on the river and the wildlife and fish species there, as those who are situated on or near the river depend heavily on these resources for their survival and livelihoods.

Second, the team from KESAN researching the Daw Lar Lake in Karen (Kayin) State, Myanmar previewed a short clip from the newly launched Salween Stories multimedia platform, showcasing their findings and analysis on the community-based governance of the lake and its resources. Community action was urged, both in this case study and for the wider region as the lake's resources were changing and starting to have an effect on the local communities there.  

Lastly, the Green Watershed team took us to the Nu River (jiang/江)river basin in Yunnan, China where their documentary focused on the changing policies and attitudes in the region which is now being designated as an expansive ecotourism development project sponsored by both the Central and local governments aimed to conserve this national beauty.  

 Local handicrafts from Daw Lar lake in Karen (Kayin) state, Myanmar (Credit: R. IRven)

Local handicrafts from Daw Lar lake in Karen (Kayin) state, Myanmar (Credit: R. IRven)